Courses and Curriculum

HIST 108: The United States to 1877

A survey of the history of the U.S. from pre-Columbian societies and European colonization through the Revolution, Westward Expansion, the Civil War and Reconstruction. Emphasis is  laced  on the evolution of the nation’s political and economic institutions, as well as social, cultural, and foreign policy history.  Offered on-campus and online, Fall, Spring. 3 units.

HIST 110: The United States Since 1865

A survey of the U.S. from Reconstruction through industrialization, overseas expansion, the Progressive Era, the Great Depression, the World Wars, the Cold War, and America’s role in the contemporary world. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of the nation’s political and economic institutions, as well as social, cultural, and foreign policy history.  Offered on-campus. Fall, Spring. 3 units.  Expected online offering Spring 2021.

HIST 111:  World History to 1500

This course will survey world history from the Paleolithic period to the end of the 15th century CE with a particular focus on the interactions between nations and civilizations. The course will examine the political, economic, religious, and social structures that shaped civilizations in Mesopotamia, Europe, East and South Asia, Africa, and the Americas, and how they evolved
over time and continue to shape our world. Alternate Spring semesters, 3 units.

HIST 112: World History Since 1500

This course will survey world history from the beginning of the 15th century CE to the present with a particular focus on the interactions between nations and civilizations. The course will examine the political, economic, religious, and social structures that shaped civilizations in Mesopotamia, Europe, East and South Asia, Africa, and the Americas, and how they evolved
over time and continue to shape our world.  Fall, Spring. 3 units.

HIST 120: Women in American History

A multicultural review of the role, status and contributions of women in American history from colonial times to present. Emphasis is on the political, social, cultural, and economic conditions that produced the attitudes and actions by and about women.  Alternate Spring semesters, 3 units.

HIST 130: Native American History

Survey of history of Native Americans from Columbus to present. Deals with Indian environment, culture, economy and way of life. Covers Spanish, French and British periods of contact with a greater emphasis on Indian-American period. Native American leaders, tribes, and nations and their relationship to the Federal Government from 1790 to the present are emphasized. Alternate Spring semesters, 3 units.

HIST 135: African American History

This course is designed to introduce students to major themes, issues, and debates in African American history from its African origins to the present. Some of the specific topics covered include African antecedents, colonial and antebellum slavery, the abolition movement, the free black experience, the Civil War, emancipation, Jim Crow segregation, racial violence, black culture, the modern freedom struggle, popular culture, political movements, and the contemporary experience. Students will gain an understanding of how enslaved and free African Americans have lived, worked, socialized, and defined themselves in American society.  Alternate Spring semesters, 3 units.

HIST 140: California History

The history and development of California from the pre-contact era to the present. Includes pre-Columbian, Spanish, Mexican and American periods. Course will survey the changes as they occurred from simple agrarian economy to the agricultural-industrial political economy of today. Course will also examine California institutions, the environmental issues of the state’s  development, and the historical and present multicultural environment of California.  Fall, 3 units.

HIST 110: The United States Since 1865

A survey of the U.S. from Reconstruction through industrialization, overseas expansion, the Progressive Era, the Great Depression, the World Wars, the Cold War, and America’s role in the contemporary world. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of the nation’s political and economic institutions, as well as social, cultural, and foreign policy history.  Offered oncampus. Fall, Spring. 3 units.  Expected online offering Spring 2021.

HIST 170 - Democracy in Practice, Washington DC Week

This course will explore “democracy in practice” through lecture and study, attendance and participation in a local government or community political event, and a fully supervised and coordinated week in Washington, D.C., Monticello, and Gettysburg. It will explore the behavior of key actors in national government institutions. It also will examine how individuals and groups can affect and are affected by the institutions and people of national and local government. The course would be especially helpful to any who aspire to a career in education. Each
student shall be required to pay for the cost of airfare, hotel, meals and incidentals for the trip to Washington, in addition to regular college fees. Cross-listed with POL 170.  Off campus, 3 units.

HIST 172 – Democracy in Practice, Landmarks of Civil Rights

This course will explore “democracy in practice” through lecture and discussion, attendance and participation in a community political event, and a fully supervised week visiting prominent places in the history of the Civil Rights Movement in the southern states of the U.S. It will examine how individuals and groups influence major institutional political changes in local, state and national policy. Each student will be required to pay the cost of airfare, hotels, meals, and incidental costs of a ten-day excursion that includes Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Tennessee. Cross-listed with POL172 and HUMN172.  Off-campus, 3 units.

HIST 400: The American West

Study of the history of the American West from European contact to the present. Topics will include the role of the US government and the effects of American expansionism with particular focus on the environment, economic development, and conflicts over resources and land as well as the historiography of the West.  This is an upper division course currently open only to Juniors enrolled in the Bachelor Degree Equine & Ranch Management Program.  Fall, 3 units.

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