Courses & Curriculum

SOC100 Sex, Gender, & Society 
Consult schedule of classes for semester offering 

This course is an overview of the sociological analysis of the social construction of masculinity and femininity historically and cross-culturally. It examines the debates on sex and gender. It analyzes the impact of economic and political change on gender expectations and practices. It focuses macro-analyses of how institutions shape gender and microanalyses of how individuals are socialized and how they “do” and practice gender.

SOC102 Introduction to Sociology

Sample Syllabus 

Offered fall, spring, summer semesters on-campus & online

This course is an introduction to the concepts, perspectives, theories, and methods of sociology. Students will study the individual’s relationship with society by analyzing socialization and the self, group dynamics, social stratification, diversity, social change, and social institutions in various cultural contexts. 

SOC140 Introduction to Race & Ethnicity

Sample Syllabus 

Offered fall semesters (odd years, 2015, 2017 etc.) on-campus

Sociological analysis of race, and ethnicity, and examination of the cultural, political, and economic practices and institutions that support or challenge racism and inequality. This course explores the historical and contemporary interactions between various racial and ethnic groups using sociological perspectives and political theories. Cross-listed with POL140.

SOC150 Social Trends & Problems

Consult class schedule for semester offering 

This course examines contemporary social trends and problems in U.S. institutions, including: (1) the role of power and ideology in the definition of social problems, (2) their causes and consequences, (3) evaluations of proposed solutions, and (4) methods of intervention.  Topics include crime, delinquency and violence, social inequality, family, race relations, education, environmental degradation, drugs and alcohol, and health care, among others.

SOC160 Globalization

Sample Syllabus 

Offered fall semesters on-campus

Students in this course will be introduced to the processes and structures of globalization that make the world more interconnected. Using theoretical perspectives and debates around globalization, students will delve into topics such as colonialism; political economy; economic and social development; the migration of people and ideas; environment and development; tourism; and responses to globalization throughout the world. Cross-listed with POL160.